Medication-Assisted Treatment

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) is the use of medications, in combination with other therapies, to provide a whole-patient approach to the treatment of substance use disorders. Examples of medications are methadone and buprenorphine for opioid addiction; naltrexone and acamprosate for alcohol addiction; and nicotine replacement therapy for tobacco smokers who are addicted to nicotine. Medications and counseling are the standard of care for a number of substance use disorders, including tobacco use disorders, alcohol use disorders, and opioid use disorders.

Individuals who are in Medication-Assisted Treatment should be aware of their rights under Federal anti-discrimination laws. Please feel free to share this information with family, friends and advocates. Learn about your rights here.

Methadone works by changing how the brain and nervous system respond to pain. It lessens the painful symptoms of opiate withdrawal and blocks the euphoric effects of opiate drugs such as heroin, morphine, and codeine, as well as semi-synthetic opioids like oxycodone and hydrocodone. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding can safely take methadone.

What is Methadone?

Methadone works by changing how the brain and nervous system respond to pain. It lessens the painful symptoms of opiate withdrawal and blocks the euphoric effects of opiate drugs such as heroin, morphine, and codeine, as well as semi-synthetic opioids like oxycodone and hydrocodone. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding can safely take methadone.

What is Buprenorphine?

Buprenorphine is an opioid partial agonist. This means that, like opioids, it produces effects such as euphoria or respiratory depression. With buprenorphine, however, these effects are weaker than those of full drugs such as heroin and methadone. Limited information exists on the use of buprenorphine in women who are pregnant and have an opioid dependency.

What is Naltrexone?

Naltrexone blocks the euphoric and sedative effects of drugs such as heroin, morphine, and codeine. It works differently in the body than buprenorphine and methadone, which activate opioid receptors in the body that suppress cravings. Naltrexone binds and blocks opioid receptors and is reported to reduce opioid cravings. There is no abuse and diversion potential with naltrexone.

For more information

Buprenorphine Practitioner Locator

Opioid Treatment Program Directory

Vivitrol Treatment Provider

 

Rhode Island Medication-Assisted Treatment Services

Addiction Recovery Institute RI

Locations:

North
31 North Union Street
Pawtucket, RI 02860
(401) 725-2520

South
205 Hallene Road, Suite 102
Warwick, RI 02886
(401) 737-4788

CODAC Behavioral Healthcare

Locations:

CODAC Cranston
1052 Park Avenue, Cranston, RI 02910
(401) 461-5056

CODAC Providence
349 Huntington Avenue, Providence, RI 02909
(401) 942-1450

CODAC Newport
93 Thames Street, Newport, RI 02840
(401) 846-4150

CODAC South County
350 Columbia Street, Wakefield, RI 02879
(401) 789-0934

CODAC East Bay
850 Waterman Avenue, East Providence, RI 02914
(401) 434-4999

Center for Treatment & Recovery

Location:

82 Pond Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860
(401) 727-1287

Discovery House

Locations:

66 Pavilion Avenue, Providence, RI, 02905
(877) 827-5042

1625 Diamond Hill Road, Woonsocket, RI 02895
(877) 785-5902

The Journey to Hope, Health and Healing:
(401) 946-0650

Locations:

160 Narragansett Avenue, Providence, RI 02907
(401) 941-4488
Toll Free: (888) 312-2033

985 Plainfield Street, Johnston, RI 02919
(401) 946-0650
Toll Free: (888) 312-2033

86 Beach Street, Westerly, RI 02891
(401) 596-0969
Toll Free: (888) 312-2033